Dr. Boff & Dr. Goujani
50 North Central Ave. 
Ramsey, NJ 07446
(201) 327-3060

My Blog
By Robert E. Boff, D.M.D. and Banafsheh Goujani, D.M.D.
August 12, 2018
Category: Oral Health
FifthHarmonysCamilaCabelloChipsaToothbutConcertStillWorthIt

Everyone loves a concert where there's plenty of audience participation… until it starts to get out of hand. Recently, the platinum-selling band Fifth Harmony was playing to a packed house in Atlanta when things went awry for vocalist Camila Cabello. Fans were batting around a big plastic ball, and one unfortunate swing sent the ball hurtling toward the stage — and directly into Cabello's face. Pushing the microphone into her mouth, it left the “Worth It” singer with a chipped front tooth.

Ouch! Cabello finished the show nevertheless, and didn't seem too upset. “Atlanta… u wild… love u,” she tweeted later that night. “Gotta get it fixed now tho lol.” Fortunately, dentistry offers a number of ways to make that chipped tooth look as good as new.

A small chip at the edge of the tooth can sometimes be polished with dental instruments to remove the sharp edges. If it's a little bigger, a procedure called dental bonding may be recommended. Here, the missing part is filled in with a mixture of plastic resin and glass fillers, which are then cured (hardened) with a special light. The tooth-colored bonding material provides a tough, lifelike restoration that's hard to tell apart from your natural teeth. While bonding can be performed in just one office visit, the material can stain over time and may eventually need to be replaced.

Porcelain veneers are a more long-lasting solution. These wafer-thin coverings go over the entire front surface of the tooth, and can resolve a number of defects — including chips, discoloration, and even minor size or spacing irregularities. You can get a single veneer or have your whole smile redone, in shades ranging from a pearly luster to an ultra-bright white; that's why veneers are a favorite of Hollywood stars. Getting veneers is a procedure that takes several office visits, but the beautiful results can last for many years.

If a chip or crack extends into the inner part of a tooth, you'll probably need a crown (or cap) to restore the tooth's function and appearance. As long as the roots are healthy, the entire part of the tooth above the gum line can be replaced with a natural-looking restoration. You may also need a root canal to remove the damaged pulp material and prevent infection if the fracture went too far. While small chips or cracks aren't usually an emergency (unless accompanied by pain), damage to the tooth's pulp requires prompt attention.

If you have questions about smile restoration, please contact us and schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty As Never Before” and “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By Robert E. Boff, D.M.D. and Banafsheh Goujani, D.M.D.
August 07, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

Dental ImplantsGaps in your smile don't have to be permanent. Dental implants offer an innovative way to regain your full smile. Ramsey, NJ, dentists Drs. Robert Boff, Banafsheh Goujani and Kenneth Gluck offer dental implants to patients who prefer a comfortable, long-term restoration method.

Implants serve as the foundation for your new tooth

Dental implants are tiny titanium posts added to your jawbone. The first step in the implant process requires minor oral surgery to make openings in your jawbone needed for the placement of the implants. Titanium is the perfect material for dental implants because it bonds easily to bones. In just three to six months, your implant will become a permanent part of your jawbone. Implants replace your roots and are paired with dental crowns to complete the restoration of your missing teeth.

Are implants a good choice for me?

Your Ramsey dentist will examine your mouth and review your X-rays to determine if implants will work for you. They may be a good choice if:

  • You don't smoke: Smoking can also interfere with healing and bonding.
  • Your gums are healthy: Healthy gums are required before you can receive dental implants. If you have gum disease, the disease must be successfully treated before you can begin the implant process.
  • You have good jawbone depth: A shallow jawbone won't adequately support implants. If your jawbone is too shallow, your Ramsey dentist may recommend bone grafts to increase depth.

Do implants offer any special benefits?

Implants feel like your natural teeth because they're firmly attached to your jawbone. Once your implants bond to your jawbone, you can eat any food you like and won't notice a decrease in your biting power. Dental implants also reduce your risk of jawbone resorption, a problem that can occur after tooth loss. The constant jawbone stimulation provided by your implants will help prevent your jawbone from shrinking. This is a particularly important benefit, as jawbone changes can lead to further tooth loss and facial sagging.

Restore your smile with dental implants! Call Ramsey, NJ, dentists Drs. Robert Boff, Banafsheh Goujani and Kenneth Gluck at (201) 327-3060 to schedule your appointment.

By Robert E. Boff, D.M.D. and Banafsheh Goujani, D.M.D.
August 02, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental injury  
WhenSummertimeSportsLeadtoDentalDilemmas

Summer is a great time to go outdoors and get your game on—no matter whether your court is set up for tennis or basketball, whether you’re on the diamond or on the greens. Regular physical activity can help you maintain your optimal weight, reduce your risk for certain diseases, and even lower stress levels. But many of our favorite outdoor sports also carry a risk of accidental injury…and frequently this involves injuries to the mouth.

Because they’re front and center, the incisors (front teeth) are the ones most often affected by accidental injuries. While serious damage is relatively rare, chips and cracks are not uncommon. Fortunately, dentistry offers a number of good ways to restore chipped or broken teeth. Which one is best for you depends on exactly what’s wrong—but a procedure called cosmetic bonding is one of the most common ways to repair small to moderate chips where the tooth’s soft pulp isn’t exposed.

In dental bonding, a tooth-colored material is applied directly to the tooth’s surface to fill in the chip or crack. The material itself is a high-tech mixture of tough plastic resins, translucent glass-like fillers, and other substances. Strong, durable and lifelike in appearance, these composite resins can be matched to the natural shade of your teeth.

Bonding is a conservative procedure, meaning that it requires little or no preparation of the tooth. It can be done right in the dental office, often in a single visit and without the need for anesthesia. Unlike porcelain veneers or crowns (caps), it usually doesn’t involve removing significant amounts of healthy tooth structure.

While the results can last for years, bonded restorations aren’t as durable as porcelain veneers or crowns, which are made in a dental laboratory. Bonding also isn’t suitable to repair major damage, or in cases where the tooth’s pulp could become infected; in this situation, you may need a root canal and a crown. However, for moderate chips or cracks, bonding can be an appropriate and economical way to restore your teeth to full function and aesthetic appearance.

Of course, it’s often said that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. That’s why it’s best to wear a protective mouthguard whenever you’re on the field. We can provide a custom-made mouthguard that’s comfortable to wear and offers maximum protection against dental injury—just ask!

If you have questions about cosmetic bonding or mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth with Composite Resin” and “Athletic Mouthguards.”

By Robert E. Boff, D.M.D. and Banafsheh Goujani, D.M.D.
July 23, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
DontTakeaVacationFromOralHygieneThisSummer

What are you most looking forward to this summer? Maybe you’re planning a trip to the beach, or a getaway in the woods…maybe even a journey to a faraway city or a foreign land. Wherever your holiday travel leads you, we hope it’s enjoyable and safe. And while you’re packing your bags, don’t forget to take a trio of important items that can help keep your vacation trouble-free: namely, a soft-bristled toothbrush, a tube of fluoride toothpaste, and a roll of dental floss.

If you have been careful about keeping up your oral hygiene all year, you’ve probably already noticed the rewards it can bring—like a sparkling smile, fresh breath, and good dental checkups. But even if you’re planning to get away from it all this summer, don’t take a vacation from oral hygiene. And if your oral hygiene routine could stand some improvement, maybe this is the time to make a fresh start.

Maintaining good oral health while you’re on the go doesn’t have to be a high-tech pursuit. You don’t need broadband service or a good mobile signal; you don’t even need electric power. Running water is nice, but not essential. And all the tools you need can fit easily in a travel bag.

The benefits of good oral hygiene are clear. Brushing twice every day and flossing once a day can effectively fight the bacteria that cause tooth decay and periodontal disease. That’s important any time of year, but perhaps even more so when you’re traveling because it’s harder to keep a healthy diet. Grabbing a sugary drink or a snack to go is convenient, but it provides food for the bacteria that can cause dental diseases; also, the acid in some soft drinks (even diet sodas) can wear away tooth enamel, leaving you with less protection against cavities.

Summer vacations can bring welcome surprises and unforgettable experiences. But needing urgent dental care in an unfamiliar place is the kind of surprise you can do without. So even though you may be far away from the routines of home, don’t take a vacation from your oral hygiene routine.  It takes just a few minutes, but it can keep your smile bright and healthy wherever you go.

If you would like more information about oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment.

By Robert E. Boff, D.M.D. and Banafsheh Goujani, D.M.D.
July 13, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: missing teeth  
TeenagerswithMissingTeethUsuallyNeedaTemporaryRestoration

Anyone at any age, including older children and teenagers, can lose or be born missing a permanent tooth. And while those missing teeth can be restored, replacing them in patients who haven’t yet reached adulthood can be tricky.

That’s because their dental and facial development isn’t finished. This is especially problematic for dental implants because as the jaws continue to grow, a “non-growing” implant could eventually appear out of alignment with the surrounding natural teeth. That’s why it’s often better to install a temporary restoration until the jaws fully mature in early adulthood. Two great choices are a removable partial denture (RPD) or a bonded (“Maryland”) bridge.

While “dentures” and “teens” don’t seem to go together, an RPD in fact can effectively restore a teen’s lost dental function and appearance. Of the various types of RPDs the one usually recommended for teens has a hard acrylic base colored to resemble the gums, to which we attach prosthetic (“false”) teeth at their appropriate positions on the jaw.

Besides effectiveness, RPDs are easy to clean and maintain. On the downside, though, an RPD can break and—as a removable appliance—become lost. They can also lose their fit due to changes in jaw structure.

The bonded bridge is similar to a traditional fixed bridge. But there’s one big difference: traditional bridges crown the natural teeth on either side of the missing teeth to secure them in place. The supporting teeth must be significantly (and permanently) altered to accommodate the life-like crowns on either end of the bridge.

Instead, a bonded bridge affixes “wings” of dental material extending from the back of the bridge to the back of the natural teeth on either side. While not quite as strong as a regular bridge, the bonded bridge avoids altering any natural teeth.

While a fixed bridge conveniently stays in place, they’re more difficult than an RPD to keep clean. And while less prone to breakage, they aren’t entirely immune to certain stresses from biting and chewing especially in the presence of some poor bites (how the upper and lower teeth come together).

Choosing between the two restorations will depend on these and other factors. But either choice can serve your teen well until they’re able to permanently replace their missing teeth.

If you would like more information on dental restorations for teens, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.





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